Charlie Lucas
As a child Charlie Lucas took refuge from life’s hardships in making things to play with, taking them apart, and remaking them. He didn’t consider himself an artist. He was just making toys. In 1984 while recuperating from a major back injury at work, Charlie resolved to spend the rest of his life doing what he loved to do. He called his new artistic identity “Tin Man.”
Now Charlie spends happy days driving around in his truck, collecting other people’s cast-offs, and bringing the so-called trash back to life in a new form. He cuts, bends, weaves, and welds scrap metal into fantastic assemblages filled with faces and motion. His paintings are abstract views of people and animals involved in life’s struggles and joys. He paints on scrap wood, adds more scrap objects, and uses salvaged materials for frames. He says the scraps and parts speak their stories to him even before he cuts and welds them together. Charlie can tell a story for every piece of art he creates, but he also encourages viewers to look for themselves and make up their own stories. He refers to his creations as “toys.”
Charlie’s message to the children and adults that come to learn from him is that many things in life are not pretty & shiny. We have to be willing to see the value of the ugliness as well.
CHOOSE AN ARTIST
FROM THE LIST
Selma & Pink Lily, AL
"Tin Man" describes the life and art of Charlie Lucas from a unique point of view - that of Charlie himself. The artist shares his painful life experiences and opens the door to his creations.
Beautiful photos of his work are included. Check it out!

Published by The University of Alabama Press
Available on Amazon
COOKIE
(TV SNACK)
12.5" x 14.5"
SOLD
WALKING SPIRITS
(TV SNACK)
16" x 12"
$150
SELF PORTRAIT
(TV SNACK)
16" x 12"
$150
HOUSEPET
(TV SNACK)
15.5" x 12
$150
Charlie calls small unframed paintings like these "TV Snacks" because he makes them while he watches TV.

These are four of our favorite "TV Snacks"
HUSBAND AND WIFE
scrap & cut metal hanging assemblage
The second face is the barbed wire.
You can decide which is which.
8" x 16" x 4"
$450
DO-RAG WOMEN
cut metal shingles & rags
hanging assemblages
8.5" x 14" x 2"
$150 each
"Women had to walk to work every day, early in the morning before sun-up. In the South the mornings were always warm and damp. They never were good hair days. They tied up their heads with scarves or bandanas or scraps of cloth to keep the hair out the way all day. In the evening when they came home they could finally take off the rags and let their hair loose."
ANOTHER FLYING MACHINE
26" x 26"
$400
ANOTHER HOUSEPET
28" x 28"
SOLD
DESERT FLOWERS
20" x 20"
$300
LOOKING AT THE TV
20" x 16"
$200
ON THE FARM
21" x 14"
$200
CLICK HERE
for more about
CHARLIE LUCAS
Questions about an item or an artist?...ready to buy?...